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6 Indoor Plants To Avoid If You Think You Have Allergies

6 Indoor Plants To  Avoid If You Think You Have Allergies

No one can imagine a beautifully decorated home without a few well-kept houseplants. Not to mention that taking care of a plant has a multitude of benefits for both the body and the soul. But, what if nature’s little wonders seem to wreak havoc to your immune system? If you are an allergy sufferer, you may think that all plants are potentially harmful to you. In truth, some indoor plants are more likely to cause allergies than others.

Here are a few examples of plants you should avoid having in your home or workspace.

1. Bonsai

Bonsai Tree

Those mini trees look really amazing though certain types of bonsai (juniper, cedar) could cause a lot of trouble to people allergic to birch. They also need careful pruning and shaping, which means that you should always wear gloves when caring for them to avoid skin irritation.

Weeping Fig

2. Weeping Fig

This species is beautiful and easy to care for, but also one of the most common indoor sources of allergens after dust mites and pets. Particles from the leaves, trunk, and sap of the plant can cause a reaction similar to latex allergy. All in all, it’s best to avoid this plant altogether.

Male Palms and Yuccas

3. Male Palms and Yuccas

Male palms tend to produce a lot of pollen, which can spread very easily into your home. Still, if you have set your heart on an indoor palm, make sure you get a tree that only produces female flowers. Yuccas, while quite popular for both outdoors and indoors, present a similar risk to palm trees.

Fern

4. Fern

If your allergy or asthma symptoms seem to get worse indoors, the spores released from your fern could be responsible. This is another allergenic plant that can also cause a rash that resembles poison ivy skin irritation.

African-Violet-Blossoms

5. African Violet

Those deep purple blossoms are hard to resist. Nevertheless, they come with fuzzy leaves that gather a lot of dust. A simple solution would be to regularly wipe the leaves down with a damp cloth. However, if you are very sensitive to dust, choose another flower for your home.

Chrysanthemum

6. Chrysanthemum

While the colorful fall blossoms are typically found outdoors, you may be tempted to add them to a vase and brighten up your favorite room. Before you do that keep in mind that this flower is related to ragweed, a common plant responsible for many seasonal allergies.

So, are there any hypoallergenic houseplants?

Living with hay fever or asthma doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy a little bit of gardening. On the contrary, some plants can help you clean the air in your home and reduce your exposure to allergens. Some hypoallergenic plants are marginata, peace lily, dracaena, mother-in-law’s tongue, golden pothos, philodendron, and others.

Remember to always choose your houseplants carefully and add them to your living space one at a time to monitor possible allergic reactions. Moreover, don’t neglect to wear gloves when caring for your plants and spray their leaves with water regularly.

Recommended Reading

“Desert Plants Causing Havoc for Arizona Allergy Sufferers” : allergyarizona.net/desert-plants-causing-havoc-for-arizona-allergy-suffers/

“5 Tips for Preventing Hay Fever in Arizona”: allergyarizona.net/tips-for-preventing-hay-fever-in-arizona/

Reis, A. ” Allergies to Houseplants”, beyondallergy.com/indoor-allergies/allergies-to-house-plants.php.

Baley, Anne. ” Low Allergy Houseplants: Which Houseplants relieve allergies”: gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/hpgen/houseplants-for-allergies.htm.

Written by the Arizona allergy and asthma specialists, Adult and Pediatric Allergy Associates, P.C. If you are visiting or live in the Phoenix area and may be suffering from chronic or seasonal allergies, please contact us for an appointment by calling 602-242-4592.

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