Book an Appointment

All Posts tagged allergic reactions

Allergies and COVID-19: Why Continuing Treatment is So Important

Allergies and COVID-19: Why Continuing Treatment is So Important

For those with allergies to bee stings and insect venom, every trip outside can be a frightening experience. These allergy victims never know when a sting will come out of nowhere, sending them scrambling for their epi-pens and possibly even sending them to the emergency room.

The fact that bee sting allergies can impact so many aspects of someone’s life is just one reason why continuing with venom immunotherapy is so important, even in the time of COVID-19. The pandemic is truly dangerous, but there are protocols in place to keep patients safe as they continue with their therapy and learn to live without the constant fear of stinging insects and other outdoor allergens.

It is only natural to try to avoid public spaces and crowded gatherings in the age of coronavirus. Making these common sense changes and taking these precautions is a very smart thing to do, but that should not mean a disruption in your medical care or making a change to your immunotherapy.

Covid-19 allergy Symptoms

The fact is the risk of bee stings for an allergic individual is far greater than even the risk of COVID-19 infection, and continuing therapy for these allergic reactions is actually more important than ever. With indoor spaces especially dangerous in terms of COVID-19 exposure, spending time outdoors can be a smart, and healthy, alternative, but only if you continue your venom immunotherapy treatments so you can safely spend time outside and worry less about bee stings.

Stopping your therapy too soon could have devastating consequences in the age of COVID-19, both for allergy sufferers and for the public health system as a whole. Ever since the pandemic got started, emergency rooms have been overrun, with long waits and the ever-present danger of transmission. If you stop your venom immunotherapy too soon and head outdoors before your treatments have concluded, you could be at greater risk of a serious allergic reaction – and a trip to an already overwhelmed ER.

By continuing with your venom immunotherapy treatments, you can protect yourself from the danger of bee stings and potentially dangerous reactions. Plus you will also be doing your part to protect the wider public by easing the strain on overcrowded emergency rooms and preserving valuable resources for the sickest patients.

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic started raging, preventing illness was always preferable to trying to treat it after the fact. This is certainly the case when it comes to bee stings, and by continuing with their allergy treatments, those who are hypersensitive to insect venom can continue to live their lives without worrying about what is behind every bush or lurking inside every outdoor trash can.

Venom immunotherapy has proven to be remarkably effective, with as many as 98 out of 100 patients showing improvements over their non-treated counterparts. If you have been undergoing this type of therapy to deal with your insect venom allergy, now is not the time to stop. And if you have not considered this type of treatment before, now is the perfect time to learn more about it, and the more you know the easier it will be to make an informed and intelligent decision.

More

Shellfish Allergies in Children

Shellfish Allergies in Children

Shellfish and sushi consumption is high in the Asia-Pacific, Phoenix and growing all over the U.S.  Unfortunately, reports of allergy responses from shellfish have also increased. Shellfish allergies are common in adults compared to children; and in male children compared to female ones. In addition, if your family has a history of shellfish allergies, your child may be more likely to be allergic too.

Some of the shellfish causing the allergic reactions are crustaceans and mollusks such as shrimp, crab, lobster, clam, oyster and mussel though prawns/ shrimp was most commonly implicated in shellfish allergies which are commonly found in sushi rolls and at many restaurants.

Tropomyosin is the allergen in shellfish causing this immune reaction among other proteins such as arginine kinase. Shellfish proteins can come in contact with your child through ingestion, inhalation – of fumes while cooking – or even skin contact.

Allergy reactions vary by age and even by region. Symptoms of shellfish allergy are hives, eczema, wheezing, dizziness, gastrointestinal symptoms. More severe anaphylactic reactions can cause breathing obstruction, dizziness and shock with high pulse and dropping blood-pressure which can be fatal.

selfishfood

Diagnosis

It is important to differentiate allergy reaction from shellfish food poisoning. Toxins stored within the shellfish – domoic acid, brevetoxins, saxitoxins, azaspiracids, biotoxins and bacterial/viral toxins – can affect your nervous, gastrointestinal and other systems.

Allergic reactions are therefore verified using a variety of tests including skin prick testing.

Treatment

Like most food allergies, avoidance of the allergy-causing food is suggested.

  • You should take care to avoid all shellfish for your child; check with your doctor/dietician.
  • Eating in restaurants where the oil or vessels/surfaces may have come in contact with shellfish can cause allergic reactions. You may decide to avoid restaurants where shellfish or fish are on the menu.
  • Carrying and knowing how to use an epinephrine auto injector may be useful; teach your child this, once he or she is a bit older
  • Doctors also suggest introducing shellfish earlier – to babies as young as 6 months – as this may actually reduce chances of allergies. Monitor your child after introducing the new food and if there are no adverse reactions; include the new food as part of his or her regular diet.

Reference:

https://www.todaysparent.com/baby/baby-development/babywearing-techniques-for-winter/

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/shellfish-allergy/basics/risk-factors/con-20032093

More